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Ocotillo Botánica

Ushabti Statue

Ushabti Statue

Regular price $20.00 USD
Regular price Sale price $20.00 USD
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Historical Reproduction - Vintage - 2001

DeAgostini, The Glory of Ancient Egypt, Collectors Figurine

Issue No. 13 - Statue Only

Approximately 4” tall

USHABTI

The Ushabti, also known as shabti or shawabti, is a type of ancient Egyptian funerary figurine commonly found in tombs and burial sites throughout ancient Egypt. These small figurines were placed in tombs to serve as servants or substitutes for the deceased in the afterlife, performing labor and tasks required for their eternal well-being.

Ushabtis typically depict a mummiform figure, resembling a wrapped mummy, with arms crossed over the chest and holding agricultural tools such as hoes, baskets, or sacks. They are usually made of various materials, including faience, wood, stone, or metal, and range in size from a few centimeters to several inches tall.

The term "Ushabti" translates to "answerer" or "those who answer" in ancient Egyptian, reflecting their role as servants who were expected to respond when called upon to perform tasks in the afterlife. According to ancient Egyptian beliefs, the deceased would be required to perform manual labor in the afterlife, such as tilling fields, planting crops, or building structures. The Ushabtis were intended to fulfill these duties on behalf of the deceased, allowing them to enjoy a leisurely existence in the afterlife.

Ushabtis were often inscribed with spells or texts from the Book of the Dead, which were believed to empower the figurines and enable them to carry out their duties effectively. These inscriptions typically invoked the names of specific gods or provided instructions for the Ushabtis to respond when called upon by the deceased.

The use of Ushabtis became widespread during the New Kingdom period (around 1550–1070 BCE) and continued into the Late Period and Ptolemaic period of ancient Egyptian history. They were considered essential items for ensuring the deceased's comfort and well-being in the afterlife, and tombs often contained large numbers of Ushabtis, ranging from a few to several hundred, depending on the wealth and status of the deceased.

Today, Ushabtis are prized artifacts in museum collections around the world, where they provide valuable insights into ancient Egyptian funerary beliefs and practices. They stand as poignant reminders of the Egyptians' profound reverence for the afterlife and their meticulous preparations for the journey to eternity.

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